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What is the difference between Serum and Plasma?

We explain that what is the difference between Serum and Plasma? Plasma and serum are the names of two different but equally important components of blood. Each of them has important characteristics that play crucial roles when analyzing blood samples.what is the difference between serum and plasmaplasma

What is blood serum?

The serum is the liquid obtained from the blood when this is then allowed to coagulate extraction. It is used in a number of clinical and biochemical trials. Importantly, serum is not a part of the blood, but is the result of allowing the blood to clot outside the body. Therefore, it is formed after blood clotting. The serum helps in the diagnosis of diseases such as blood pressure, sugar, cholesterol, etc.what is the difference between serum and plasma

How is serum obtained from blood?

The serum comes from blood obtained from an arterial or venous puncture without anticoagulant. The blood is allowed to clot and the fibrin, blood cells and platelets are separated from the serum by means of centrifugation.

To obtain the serum, wait at least one hour at room temperature before centrifugation, to ensure that the coagulation process is carried out in its entirety.

What is serum used for?

blood

The serum retains a high concentration of antibodies. Consequently, it  is used to treat infections through a mechanism known as an immune response .

On the other hand, serum has a high concentration of electrolytes. Because of this, it is also used to treat patients with chronic dehydration . It is generally combined with other nutrients that provide energy and vitality to the patient.

What is blood plasma?

Plasma is the medium of the blood in which there are different types of blood cells. Red blood cells, white blood cells, and other blood components are suspended in the plasma..

  • Plasma is the liquid part of the blood. It contains the clotting agent fibrinogen, which prevents excessive blood flow during an injury. It also contains proteins that help in the transport of glucose and other nutrients to different parts of the body.
  • Plasma helps regulate body temperature.
  • It is also responsible for controlling blood pressure.
  • Plasma is obtained in the upper layer during centrifugation. It separates to increase longevity up to years and also to facilitate its transport from one place to another.
  • A cellular component : includes white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
  • An acellular component : made up of plasma , where proteins are dissolved, such as coagulation factors, albumin, lipoproteins, calcium, sodium, potassium, hormones and glucose, among other compounds.

Plasma is obtained from blood obtained with an anticoagulant, a compound that prevents clotting. Blood is drawn by venipuncture and placed in vacuum-sealed tubes containing the required amount of anticoagulant.what is the difference between serum and plasmawhat is the difference between serum and plasma

Commonly used anticoagulants are EDTA, heparin, or citrate. The use of each depends on the type of chemical tests to be carried out. what is the difference between serum and plasma

The plasma is then separated from the solid elements in the blood by means of centrifugation. Plasma can be obtained quickly as it does not need a waiting time to produce clotting, as in the case of serum. what is the difference between serum and plasma

What is blood plasma used for?

Blood plasma is made up mostly of water . However, it also preserves important components such as vitamins, hormones or proteins. The  most important proteins in plasma are:

  • Albumin . It is responsible for maintaining blood pressure.
  • Globulins . They perform defense functions .
  • Coagulation factors . Involved in wound healing.
  • Lipoproteins . They stabilize other lipid molecules in an aqueous environment such as blood.

Blood plasma is used in patients who have suffered burns . The objective is to replace the fluids and proteins lost, since the skin in these cases is not able to retain fluids.

The coagulant benefits of plasma are also taken advantage of in people with coagulation deficiencies, such as hemophiliacs .

Other important functions of serum and blood plasma

Platelet rich plasma

Platelet

Blood plasma contains a significant amount of substances that participate in the tissue regeneration process. In this process, it has the power to stimulate the repair of damaged tissues .

Through the technique of applying platelet-rich plasma for facial rejuvenation , the cells responsible for producing collagen, elastin and hyaluronic acid are activated . This allows for the biostimulation necessary for tissue regeneration.

Blood serum

what is the difference between serum and plasma

Blood serum, for its part,  has antibacterial, antiviral and antioxidant functions.

Therefore, it is also called immune serum . And it is that it is rich in components that make up the body’s immune system, such as antibodies.

Blood serum is used to treat mild inflammations such  as tonsillitis , cystitis or otitis. Its use has been going on for decades and has given amazing results in the treatment of certain infections.

serum vs plasma

What Is the differences between serum and plasma what is the difference between serum and plasma

Plasma and serum are derived from the liquid portion of the blood, however the difference between plasma and serum is quite obvious. Read on to find out how they differ.

Blood is a fluid connective tissue that travels throughout the body carrying necessary nutrients, oxygen, and metabolic waste. It also participates in the regulation of body temperature and pH levels by interacting with acids and bases.

Blood is mainly made up of RBC (red blood cells), WBC (white blood cells), plasma, and serum. Plasma and serum are the main components of blood and are used routinely in blood group analysis experiments to determine the blood group of the patient. what is the difference between serum and plasma

Plasma and serum can be separated by centrifugation of blood on the basis of weight, size, and density. Serum is the fluid that is obtained after allowing the blood to clot, while plasma is obtained after treating the blood with anticoagulant compounds.

what is the difference between serum and plasma

Difference between plasma and serum

Serum and plasma are obtained from the liquid portion of the blood that is obtained when cells are collected. However, there is a notable difference between plasma and serum. Serum is the fluid that remains after blood clotting. Whereas, plasma is the liquid that remains when anticoagulant is added to prevent clotting. what is the difference between serum and plasma

Difference between plasma and serum By comparison table

Below are the important differences between plasma and serum:

Plasma Serum
Straw-colored transparent liquid portion of blood. An undiluted fluid, the extracellular portion of blood.
It is made up of serum and clotting factor. It is the part of the blood that lacks clotting factor.
It is acquired after centrifuging blood with the anticoagulant. It is acquired after centrifuging coagulated blood.
Anticoagulant is required to obtain plasma from the blood sample. Anticoagulant is not required to separate serum from blood sample.
It consists of 55% of the total blood volume. Lower volume compared to plasma.
Comparatively easier and less time is required to separate plasma from blood sample. Difficult to separate serum from blood sample. It is a time consuming process.
Contains fibrinogen. It lacks fibrinogen.
It consists of 92% water with proteins, salts, lipids and glucose. It consists of 90% water with dissolved hormones, proteins, minerals and carbon dioxide.
It has a density of 1.025 g / ml It has a density of 1,024 g / ml.
It has a long service life. It can be kept for up to ten years. It has a short shelf life. It can only be kept for a few months.
Plasma is the main medium for the transport of excretory products. An important source of electrolytes.
Cells are freely suspended in plasma. Cells stick together by forming clots.
This is the liquid, cell-free part of the blood. If red blood cells and white blood cells are removed from a blood sample, what remains would be the plasma. Plasma is the main component of blood, representing up to 55% of the total volume. As for the serum, this is the remaining blood component once the clotting process has taken place. It can be said, in fact, that it is the equivalent or the remainder of plasma but without the substances that allow coagulation to occur.
Fibrinogen is a protein that is essential for blood clotting. Plasma contains this substance in addition to other clotting agents. Blood serum, on the other hand, is blood plasma that no longer contains fibrinogen or any other clotting agents.

Frequent Questions: Factors in plasma and serum

What is the main difference?

  1. The plasma is the fluid fraction in blood cells and formed elements of the blood are transported. It is obtained by centrifuging a blood sample adding anticoagulant agents (heparin, EDTA, etc). If anticoagulant agents are not added, the fluid obtained is not plasma but blood serum.
  2. The fibrinogen is present in blood plasma but not in serum. This is the main difference between the two.
  3. Plasma is easily obtained by centrifuging a blood sample with anticoagulants. Serum is obtained by centrifugation once the blood has clotted and is slightly more difficult to obtain.
  4. Plasma represents approximately 55% of the volume of a blood sample and its density is 1,025 g / ml. The serum represents slightly less volume and its density is slightly lower, 1,024 g / ml.

Differences between plasma and serum. Its importance in the covid-19 pandemic Dr. Mónica Gamba. Dentist and hemotherapy technician

Plasma is the liquid transport of blood elements, red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, it is composed of 90% water, mineral salts, proteins, vitamins, metabolic waste products, oxygen and Antibodies. Serum is our plasma without clotting factors, it is what we obtain after generating the blood clot.

Antibodies, which are proteins present in plasma, have been used in viral outbreaks such as for example. in our country, with the Hemorrhage Fever. It is currently being used for COVID -19. the plasma of patients who suffered from the virus disease and developed antibodies against it. These Antibodies are IGMs.

The plasma used is obtained by AFERESIS, a method by which the patient’s plasma is separated and the rest of the blood elements are reinfused to the donor.

What is sought with plasma transfusion is NOT to cure the disease but to neutralize the virus, either so that it does not enter the cell or remove it if it has been infected.

The treatment is experimental and tends to reduce complications, so far because there is no medication for the virus, or a vaccine, the immunization of the patient can be slow against it, so the use of plasma from convalescent patients is therapeutics at this time.

Normal laboratory values of blood, plasma and serum

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Conventional units

SI units

Acetoacetate Plasma <1 mg / dL <0.1 mmol / L
Acetylcholinesterase (ACE), RBC Blood 26.7 to 49.2 U / g Hb
Acid phosphatase Serum 0.5-5.5 U / L 0–0.9 mckat / L
Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) Plasma 25-36 s
Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) Serum 9–52 pg / mL (morning sample) 2–11 pmol / L (morning sample)
Albumin Serum 3.5 to 5.4 g / dL 35-54 g / L
Aldosterone
Standing Serum 7-20 ng / dL 194-554 pmol / L
Supine Serum 2-5 ng / dL 55-138 pmol / L
Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) Serum 36–150 U / L 0.5–2.5 mckat / L
Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) Serum 83 to 199 mg / dL 15.3-36.6 mcmol / L
Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) Serum 0-20 ng / dL 0-20 pg / L
Δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) Serum 15-23 mcg / L 1.14-1.75 mcmol / L
Aminotransferase, Alanine (ALT) Serum 0-35 U / L 0-0.58 pkat / L
Aminotransferase, aspartate (AST) Serum 0-35 U / L 0-0.58 pkat / L
Ammonia Plasma 40-80 mcg / dL 23-47 mcmol / L
Amylase Serum 0-130 U / L 0–2.17 mckat / L
Antibodies against extractable nuclear antigen (AENA) Serum <20.0 units
Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies Serum ≤ 5.0 units
Antidiuretic hormone (ADH; arginine vasopressin) Plasma <1.7 pg / mL <1.57 pmol / L
Anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, IgG Serum <25 IU
M2 antimitochondrial antibodies Serum <0.1 units
Cytoplasmic Antineutrophil Antibodies (cANCA) Serum Negative
Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) Serum ≤ 1.0 unit
Anti-smooth muscle antibody titer (ASMA) Serum ≤ 1:80
Antistreptolysin O titer Serum <150 units
Antithyroid microsomal antibody titer Serum <1: 100
alpha 1 -Antitrypsin (AAT) Serum 83 to 199 mg / dL 15.3-36.6 mcmol / L
Apolipoproteins:
AI, women Serum 98 – 210 mg / dL 0.98 – 2.1 g / L
AI, males Serum 88 – 180 mg / dL 0.88 to 1.8 g / L
B-100, women Serum 44 – 148 mg / dL 0.44 to 1.48 g / L
B-100, males Serum 55–151 mg / dL 0.55 to 1.51 g / L
Baking soda Serum 23-28 mEq / L 23-28 mmol / L
Bilirubin:
Direct Serum 0-0.3 mg / dL 0–5.1 mcmol / L
Total Serum 0.3–1.2 mg / dL 5.1-20.5 mcmol / L
Blood volumes (radioisotope labeled):
Plasma, women * Blood 28-43 mL / kg of body weight 0.028 – 0.043 L / kg of body weight
Plasma, male * Blood 25-44 mL / kg of body weight 0.025-0.044 L / kg of body weight
Red blood cells, female * Blood 20-30 mL / kg of body weight 0.02-0.03 L / kg of body weight
Red blood cells, male * Blood 25-35 mL / kg of body weight 0.025-0.035 L / kg of body weight
Brain natriuretic peptide (type B) Plasma <100 pg / mL
Calcitonin, age ≥ 16 years:
Women Serum <8 pg / mL
Males Serum <16 pg / mL
Calcium Serum 9-10.5 mg / dL 2.2 to 2.6 mmol / L
Cancer Antigen (CA):
CA 125 Serum <35 U / mL
CA 15-3 Serum <30 U / mL
Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) content Serum 23-28 mEq / L 23-28 mmol / L
Carbon dioxide partial pressure (P CO 2 ) Blood 35-45 mmHg
Carboxyhemoglobin Plasma 0.5–5%
Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) Serum <2 ng / mL <2 mcg / L
Carotene Serum 75–300 mcg / L 1.4-5.6 mcmol / L
CD4: CD8 ratio Blood 1–4
CD4 + T cell count Blood 640-1175 / mcL 0.64 to 1.18 x 10 9 / L
CD8 + T cell count Blood 335-875 / mcL 0.34 – 0.88 x 10 9 / L
Ceruloplasmin Serum 25- 43 mg / dL 250-430 mg / L
Chloride Serum 98-106 mEq / L 98-106 mmol / L
Cholesterol, desirable level:
High-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) Plasma ≥ 40 mg / dL ≥ 1.04 mmol / L
Low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) Plasma ≤ 130 mg / dL ≤ 3.36 mmol / L
Total (TC) Plasma 150-199 mg / dL 3.88 to 5.15 mmol / L
Clotting factors:
Factor I Plasma 150–300 mg / dL 1.5-3.5 g / L
Factor II Plasma 60-150% of normal
Factor IX Plasma 60-150% of normal
Factor V Plasma 60-150% of normal
Factor VII Plasma 60-150% of normal
Factor VIII Plasma 60-150% of normal
X Factor Plasma 60-150% of normal
Factor XI Plasma 60-150% of normal
Factor XII Plasma 60-150% of normal
Complement:
C3 Serum 55-120 mg / dL 0.55 to 1.20 g / L
C4 Serum 20–59 mg / dL 0.20 to 0.59 g / L
Total Serum 37-55 U / mL 37-55 kU / L
Copper Serum 70-155 mcg / L 11 – 24.3 mcmol / L
Cortisol:
1 h after cosyntropin Serum > 18 mcg / dL and usually ≥ 8 mcg / dL above baseline > 498 nmol / L and usually ≥ 221 nmol / L above baseline
At 5 pm Serum 3-13 mcg / dL 83 – 359 nmol / L
At 8 am Serum 8-20 mcg / dL 251-552 nmol / L
After night suppression test Serum <5 mcg / dL <138 nmol / L
peptide C Serum 0.9 – 4.3 ng / mL 297-1419 pmol / L
C-reactive protein (CRP) Serum <0.5 mg / dL <0.005 g / L
Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) Serum <1.1 mg / L <0.0011 g / L
Creatine kinase (CK) Serum 30-170 U / L 0.5 to 2.83 mckat / L
Creatinine Serum 0.7-1.3 mg / dL 61.9-115 mcmol / L
D- dimer Plasma ≤ 300 ng / mL ≤ 300 mcg / L
Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S):
Women Plasma 0.6 to 3.3 mg / mL 1.6-8.9 mcmol / L
Males Plasma 1.3 to 5.5 mg / mL 3.5-14.9 mcmol / L
Δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) Serum 15-23 mcg / L 1.14-1.75 mcmol / L
11-deoxycortisol (DOC):
After metyrapone Plasma > 7 mcg / dL > 203 nmol / L
Basal Plasma <5 mcg / dL <145 nmol / L
Level d -Xylose 2 hours after ingestion of 25 g of d -xylose Serum > 20 mg / dL > 1.3 nmol / L
Epinephrine, supine Plasma <75 ng / L <410 pmol / L
Erythrocyte sedimentation rate
Blood 0-20 mm / h 0-20 mm / h
Women
Blood 0-15 mm / h 0-20 mm / h
Males
Erythropoietin Serum 4.0 to 18.5 mIU / mL 4.0 to 18.5 IU / L
Estradiol , women:
Day 1-10 of the menstrual cycle Serum 14-27 pg / mL 50-100 pmol / L
Day 11 – 20 of the menstrual cycle Serum 14-54 pg / mL 50-200 pmol / L
Day 21 to 30 of the menstrual cycle Serum 19-40 pg / mL 70-150 pmol / L
Estradiol , males Serum 10-30 pg / mL 37-110 pmol / L
Ferritin:
Women Serum 30–200 ng / mL 30–200 mcg / L
Males Serum 30–300 ng / mL 30–300 mcg / L
alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) Serum 0-20 ng / dL 0-20 pg / L
Fibrinogen Plasma 150-350 mg / dL 1.5-3.5 g / L
Folate (folic acid):
Erythrocytes Blood 160-855 ng / mL 362-1937 nmol / L
Serum Serum 2.5–20 ng / mL 5.7 to 45.3 nmol / L
Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), women
Follicular or luteal phase Serum 5-20 mU / mL 5-20 U / L
Mid-cycle peak Serum 30-50 mU / mL 30-50 U / L
Postmenopausal Serum > 35 mU / mL > 35 U / L
Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Adult Men Serum 5-15 mU / mL 5-15 U / L
Fructosamine Plasma 200-285 mol / L
Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) Serum 8-78 U / L
Gastrine Serum 0-180 pg / mL 0-180 ng / L
Globulins: Serum 2.5 to 3.5 g / dL 25-35 g / L
Alpha-1 globulins Serum 0.2-0.4 g dL 2 – 4 g / L
Alpha-2 globulins Serum 0.5-0.9 g / dL 5-9 g / L
Beta globulins Serum 0.6 – 1.1 g / dL 6–11 g / L
Beta-2 microglobulin Serum 0.7 – 1.8 mcg / mL
Gamma globulins Serum 0.7 – 1.7 g / dL 7 – 17 g / L
Glucose:
2-h postprandial Plasma <140 mg / dL <7.8 mmol / L
Fast Plasma 70-105 mg / dL 3.9 – 5.8 mmol / L
Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) Blood 5-15 U / g Hb 0.32-0.97 mU / mol Hb
Gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) Serum 8-78 U / L
Growth hormone
After oral glucose Plasma <2 ng / mL <2 mcg / L
In response to provocative stimulus Plasma > 7 ng / mL > 7 mcg / L
Haptoglobin Serum 30-200 mg / dL 300-2000 mg / L
Hematocrit:
Women Blood 36–47%
Males Blood 41–51%
Hemoglobin:
Women Blood 12-16 g / dL 120-160 g / L
Males Blood 14-17 g / dL 140-170 g / L
Hemoglobin A 1c Blood 4.7–8.5%
Hemoglobin electrophoresis, adults:
Hb A 1 Blood 95–98%
Hb A 2 Blood 2–3%
Hb C Blood 0%
Hb F Blood 0.8–2.0%
Hb S Blood 0%
Hemoglobin electrophoresis, Hb F in children:
Neonate Blood 50–80%
1-6 months Blood 8%
> 6 months Blood 1–2%
Homocysteine:
Women Plasma 0.40 to 1.89 mg / L 3-14 mcmol / L
Males Plasma 0.54 to 2.16 mg / L 4–16 mcmol / L
Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), quantitative Serum <5 mIU / mL
Immunoglobulins:
IgA Serum 70-300 mg / dL 0.7 to 3.0 g / L
IgD Serum <8 mg / dL <80 mg / L
IgE Serum 0.01 – 0.04 mg / dL 0.1-0.4 mg / L
IgG Serum 640–1430 mg / dL 6.4 to 14.3 g / L
IgG 1 Serum 280-1020 mg / dL 2.8 – 10.2 g / L
IgG 2 Serum 60–790 mg / dL 0.6 – 7.9 g / L
IgG 3 Serum 14-240 mg / dL 0.14 – 2.4 g / L
IgG 4 Serum 11 – 330 mg / dL 0.11 – 3.3 g / L
IgM Serum 20–140 mg / dL 0.2 – 1.4 g / L
Insulin, fasting Serum 1.4–14 mcIU / mL 10-104 pmol / L
IIN (international normalized index):
Therapeutic range (standard intensity therapy) Plasma 2.0-3.0
Therapeutic range in patients at increased risk (eg, patients with prosthetic heart valves) Plasma 2.5-3.5
Therapeutic range in patients with anticoagulant lupus Plasma 3.0-3.5
Iron Serum 60-160 mcg / dL 11–29 mcmol / L
Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) Serum 250-460 mcg / dL 45–82 mcmol / L
Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) Serum 60-160 U / L 1–1.67 mckat / L
Lactic acid, venous Blood 6-16 mg / dL 0.67 to 1.8 mmol / L
Lactose tolerance test Plasma > 15 mg / dL increase in plasma glucose level > 0.83 mmol / L increase in plasma glucose level
Lead Blood <40 mcg / dL <1.9 mcmol / L
Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase (LAP) Peripheral blood smear 13-130 / 100 / polymorphonuclear (PMN) neutrophilic leukocytes and bands
Lipase Serum <95 U / L <1.58 mckat / L
Lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] Serum ≤ 30 mg / dL <1.1 mcmol / L
Luteinizing hormone (LH), women:
Follicular or luteal phase Serum 5-22 mU / mL 5-22 U / L
Mid-cycle peak Serum 30-250 mU / mL 30-250 U / L
Postmenopausal Serum > 30 mU / mL > 30 U / L
Luteinizing hormone, males Serum 3-15 mU / mL 3-15 U / L
Magnesium Serum 1.5 to 2.4 mg / dL 0.62-0.99 mmol / L
Manganese Serum 0.3-0.9 ng / mL 5.5 – 16.4 nmol / L
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) Blood 28-32 pg
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) Blood 32-36 g / dL 320-360 g / L
Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) Blood 80-100 fL
Metanephrines, fractionated:
Metanephrines, free Plasma <0.50 nmol / L
Normetanephrines, free Plasma <0.90 nmol / L
Methemoglobin Blood <1.0%
Methylmalonic acid Serum 150-370 nmol / L
Anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (MPO) Serum <6.0 U / mL
Myoglobin:
Women Serum 25-58 mcg / L 1.4 to 3.5 nmol / L
Males Serum 28–72 mcg / L 1.6 to 4.1 nmol / L
Noradrenaline, supine position Plasma 50-440 pg / mL 0.3 – 2.6 nmol / L
N-terminal propeptide BNP (NT-proBNP) Plasma <125 pg / mL
5′-Nucleotidase (5’NT) Serum 4-11.5 U / L
Osmolality Plasma 275-295 mOsm / kg H 2 O 275-295 mmol / kg H 2 O
Osmotic brittleness test Blood Increased brittleness if there is hemolysis in sodium chloride> 0.5%
Decreased brittleness if there is incomplete hemolysis in 0.3% sodium chloride
Oxygen partial pressure (PO 2 ) Blood 80-100 mmHg
Parathyroid hormone (PTH) Serum 10-65 pg / mL 10-65 ng / L
Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) Plasma <2.0 pmol / L
Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) Plasma 25-35 s
pH Blood 7.38–7.44
Inorganic phosphorus Serum 3.0-4.5 mg / dL 0.97 – 1.45 mmol / L
Platelet count Blood 150–350 x 10 3 / mcL 150-350 x 10 9 / L
Platelet life time, using chromium-51 ( 51 Cr) 8-12 days
Porphyrins Plasma ≤ 1.0 mcg / dL
Potassium Serum 3.5–5 mEq / L 3.5-5 mmol / L
Prealbumin (transthyretin) Serum 18–45 mg / dL
Progesterone:
Follicular phase Serum <1 ng / mL <0.03 nmol / L
Luteal phase Serum 3–30 ng / mL 0.1 – 0.95 nmol / L
Prolactin:
Women (not pregnant) Serum <20 mcg / L <870 pmol / L
Males Serum <15 mcg / L <652 pmol / L
Prostate specific antigen, total (PSA-T) Serum 0-4 ng / mL
Prostate-specific antigen, free / total ratio (PSA-F: PSA-T) Serum > 0.25
Protein C activity Plasma 67–131%
Activated protein C resistance (APC-R) Plasma 2.2-2.6
Protein S activity Plasma 82–144%
Protein, total Serum 6-7.8 g / dL 60-78 g / L
Prothrombin time (PT) Plasma 11–13 s
Pyruvic acid Blood 0.08 – 0.16 mmol / L
Red blood cell count Blood 4.2 to 5.9 x 10 6 cells / mcL 4.2 to 5.9 x 10 12 cells / L
Survival rate of red blood cells, using 51 Cr Blood 1/2 = 28 days
Renin activity, plasma (PRA), upright, in men and women aged 18 to 39 years:
Sodium depletion Plasma 2.9 – 24 ng / mL / h
Sodium Replenishment Plasma 0.6 (or less) –4.3 ng / mL / h
Reticulocyte count
Percentage Blood 0.5–1.5%
Absolute Blood 23-90 x 10 3 / mcL 23-90 x 10 9 / L
Rheumatoid factor (RF), by nephrelometry Serum <40 U / mL <40 kU / L
Sodium Serum 136-145 mEq / L 136-145 mmol / L
Testosterone (total), adults:
Women Serum 20–75 ng / dL 0.7 – 2.6 nmol / L
Males Serum 300–1200ng / dL 10-42 nmol / L
Thrombin time Plasma 18.5-24 s
Thyroid uptake of iodine-123 ( 123 I) 5-30% of the dose administered at 24 h
Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Serum 0.5–5.0 mcUI / mL 0.5-5.0 mIU / L
Thyroxine (T 4 ):
Free Serum 0.9-2.4 ng / dL 12-31 pmol / L
Free index 4–11
Total Serum 5-12 mcg / dL 64 – 155 nmol / L
Transferrin Serum 212-360 mg / dL 2.1 to 3.6 g / L
Transferrin saturation Serum 20–50%
Triglycerides (fasting) Serum <250 mg / dL <2.82 mmol / L
Triiodothyronine (T 3 ):
Catchment Serum 25–35%
Total Serum 70 – 195 ng / dL 1.1 to 3.0 nmol / L
Troponin I Plasma <0.1 ng / mL <0.1 mcg / L
Troponin T Serum ≤ 0.03 ng / mL ≤ 0.03 mcg / L
Ureic nitrogen Serum 8-20 mg / dL 2.9 to 7.1 mmol / L
Uric acid Serum 2.5-8 mg / dL 0.15-0.47 mmol / L
Vitamin12 Serum 200–800 pg / mL 148-590 pmol / L
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
Leukocytes Blood <20 mg / dL <1,136 mcmol / L
Total Blood 0.4-1.5 mg / dL 23–85 mcmol / L
Vitamin D:
1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol ( calcitriol ) Serum 25–65 pg / mL 65-169 pmol / L
25-hydroxycholecalciferol Serum 15–80 ng / mL 37 – 200 nmol / L
White blood cell count Blood 4.5–11 x 10 3 cells / mcL 4.5–11 x 10 9 cells / L
Segmented neutrophils 2.6–8.5 x 10 3 cells / mcL 2.6–8.5 x 10 9 cells / L
Band neutrophils 0-1.2 x 10 3 cells / mcL 0-1.2 x 10 9 cells / L
Lymphocytes 0.77–4.5 x 10 3 cells / mcL 0.77–4.5 x 10 9 cells / L
Monocytes 0.14–1.3 x 10 3 cells / mcL 0.14–1.3 x 10 9 cells / L
Eosinophils 0-0.55 x 10 3 cells / mcL 0–0.55 x 10 9 cells / L
Basophils 0-0.22 x 10 3 cells / mcL 0-0.22 x 10 9 cells / L
Zinc Serum 66-110 mcg / dL 10.1–16.8 mcmol / L

* American Board of Internal Medicine : ABIM Laboratory Test Reference Ranges ̶ January 2018. Accessed 8/25/18.

Frequent Questions

What are the advantages of plasma over serum? what is the difference between serum and plasma

Plasma contains the most widely used anticoagulant heparin. It acts through a complex that forms with antithrombin-III. Antithrombin III is a protein that prevents blood clotting.

What is serum?

what is the difference between serum and plasma

Serum is the plasma from which clotting factors have been removed. what is the difference between serum and plasma

What is the difference between blood and plasma? what is the difference between serum and plasma

Plasma is the translucent part of the blood that is not red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and other cellular components. Helps blood clot and is made up of 90% water.

How is plasma collected from the body?

Collecting plasma is time consuming. It takes about an hour to collect plasma from the body. Blood is drawn from the body with the help of a needle placed in the arm, and the plasma is separated from the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. what is the difference between serum and plasma

How is serum taken from the blood?

To separate the serum from the blood, it must be centrifuged at 1600 g for 10 minutes at room temperature. These factors reduce platelet contamination. You should grab the serum that is on top of the centrifuged tube and avoid grabbing the gel or clot.

Why is serum testing done?

Serum is made to measure the amount of protein albumin in the blood. When the kidney begins to fail, albumin begins to leak into the urine. The serum test helps diagnose liver and kidney abnormalities. what is the difference between serum and plasma

What is blood serum? what is the difference between serum and plasma

The hematic serum or blood serum is the result of allowing it to clot and eliminate the clot. It is an equivalent to blood plasma, but without involving the proteins seen in coagulation (fibrinogen). what is the difference between serum and plasma

What are the proteins found in the blood?

  • Globulins
  • Fibrinogen
  • Albumins
  • Lipoproteins.

What components does the serum have?

It contains electrolytes, water and other substances such as carbon and some expanding polysaccharides.

What is blood plasma and what is it for?

As mentioned, plasma is a substance rich in platelets so it is very useful in the medical field. In the orthopedic area, it is used for plastic and dental surgery, it also serves in the field of dermatology, its efficiency is given by its capacity in wound healing and skin rejuvenation.

What is the composition of the blood?

Blood in the human adult body is distributed as follows: 4.5 and 6 liters of blood. 55% is plasma and 45% is red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.

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