CONCEPTS

What are the moons of Jupiter?

We explain what Jupiter’s moons are, how they were discovered and the list with their names. In addition, the distance between Jupiter and its moons.

  1. What are the moons of Jupiter?

In astronomy , Jupiter’s moons are the set of natural satellites that orbit this giant planet of the outer solar system . This planet , as its name reflects (Jupiter is the Roman name of the Greek god Zeus, father and ruler of the divine Olympus) is often considered the “king” of the planets given its enormous size, equivalent to 318 times that of the Earth.

So far, the existence of some 79 moons of Jupiter is known , which makes it the planet with the greatest entourage in the solar system . These moons have extremely different orbital characteristics, ranging from circular orbital to eccentric and inclined paths, in some cases turning against the direction of Jupiter’s rotation. As for their physical appearance, there are few of them larger, greater than 3100 kilometers; while the rest ranges between 5 and 250 kilometers.

So far it is thought that the moons of Jupiter were formed from the same cluster of gases and matter from which the planet emerged, although smaller ones may be the result of the destruction of other previous satellites of larger size, lost during early history from Jupiter. Some are even assumed as a direct product of the transit of asteroids, seduced by the enormous gravity of the planet king.

  1. Discovery of the moons of Jupiter

Jupiter's moons
The total number of Jupiterian satellites today amounts to 79.

The four largest moons are called the “Galilean satellites” , as they were discovered in 1610 by the famous Galileo Galilei, and were the first astronomical objects discovered orbiting another planet, although there are records of informal sightings attributed to the Chinese astronomer Gan From (c. 364 BC).

In 1892 an additional moon was discovered to the Galileans , and with the help of better and more powerful telescopes , moons continued to be added to the list in 1904, 1905, 1908, 1914, 1938, 1951 and 1974. The arrival of the space probe Voyaguer to Jupiter in 1979 revealed many more, until in 1999 and 2003 32 more moons were discovered, using ground-based detectors, and finally in 2017 an additional 12 were perceived with an updated telescope with a new 570 megapixel camera. The total number of Jupiterian satellites today amounts to 79.

  1. Name of the moons of Jupiter

The list of the numerous moons of Jupiter and their respective names is as follows:

  • Metis 43 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1979.
  • Adrastea. Irregular diameter (26x20x16), discovered in 1979.
  • Amalthea. Irregular diameter (262x146x134), discovered in 1892.
  • Baby Irregular diameter (110 × 90), discovered in 1979.
  • Io. 3643 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1610.
  • Europe. 3122 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1610.
  • Ganymede Of 5262 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1610.
  • Callisto. 4821 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1610.
  • Themisto 8 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1975.
  • Gives. 20 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1974.
  • Himalia 170 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1904.
  • Lisitea 36 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1938.
  • Elara 86 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1905.
  • Day. 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • Carpus 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • S / 2003 J 12. 1 kilometer in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Euporia 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • S / 2003 J 3. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • S / 2003 J 18. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Orthopedics 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • Euante. 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • Harpálice. 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • Praxidice 7 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • Tione. 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • S / 2003 J 16. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Yocasta 5 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • Mnemea 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Hermipé 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • Telxínoe. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • He like. 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Ananqué. 28 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1951.
  • S / 2003 J 15. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Euridome 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • Maple. 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2002.
  • Herse 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Passage 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • S / 2003 J 10. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Caldona 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • Isonoé. 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • Erinome. 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • Calé 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • Aitné 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • Take it. 5 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • S / 2003 J 9. 1 kilometer in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Carme. 46 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1938.
  • I answered. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • Megaclite 5 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • S / 2003 J 5. 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • S / 2003 J 19. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • S / 2003 J 23. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Chalice 5 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2000.
  • Pasifae 60 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1908.
  • Eukélade. 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • S / 2003 J 4. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Syncope 38 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1914.
  • Hegémone 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Cilene 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Aedea 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Kore 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Kallichore 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • Autonomous 4 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2001.
  • Calirroe 9 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 1999.
  • S / 2003 J 2. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2003.
  • S / 2010 J 1. 1 kilometer in diameter, discovered in 2010.
  • S / 2010 J 2. 1 kilometer in diameter, discovered in 2010.
  • S / 2011 J 1. 1 kilometer in diameter, discovered in 2011.
  • S / 2011 J 2. 1 kilometer in diameter, discovered in 2011.
  • S / 2016 J 1. 3 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2016.
  • S / 2017 J 1. 2 kilometers in diameter, discovered in 2017.
  1. How far are the moons of Jupiter?

Jupiter's moons
Jupiter’s rings orbit the planet 122,800 km from the center.

The numerous moons of Jupiter orbit around you on different levels. Some of the tiny ones form, together with dust and gas, the rings of Jupiter, which orbit the planet 122,800 km from the center, with a thickness of a dozen kilometers. Much closer to the planet, Galilean satellites are found as a first satellite frontier , followed by a programmed group that orbits in a medium space. All this, of course, about 594 million kilometers from our planet.

  1. Jupiter’s moons that have water

Jupiter’s largest moons have been studied for a long time as possible hosts for humanity, which goes through confirming the existence of water (usually frozen). The most important case of this is that of Europe, the sixth moon of Jupiter, geologically active and possessing a subsurface liquid ocean , which makes it the object of numerous explorations and observations. This ocean remains liquid below the icy surface of the satellite (which is about 174 to 224 degrees below zero) thanks to geothermal activity, and is even a credible candidate for extraterrestrial life.

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